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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
this is a great start. yes. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures
and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should also hear them ask for our help, because i know as much as anybody else that our kids will inherit the good things that we do. they will also inherit the things that we fail to do. and i'm about making sure that we fail less in the things that we're obligated to do for our generations. that's why i'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i personally adopted the 12 middle schools in this city to make sure that the truancy goes down, is not eliminated, that the kids who are in ou
, things that you can't even imagine happening happen in their lives. i think that's what all of us up here are talking about when we mention martin's dream. one of the other things that i would say is that we need to properly recognize martin luther king as the world leader he is. i think it diminishes him to say he was an african-american civil rights leader. he was that, but he was so much more. he was the person who symbolized one of the great new movements of human history. when i go back and read his speeches, i'm particularly struck by the way in which he linked our struggle to struggles going on around the world. when he spoke, at the end of his life in memphis, and on the last evening of his life he's speaking to sanitation workers. and we have to remember that by calling him a civil rights leader, it doesn't quite encompass why he would be in memphis leading a strike of sanitation workers. but he performed the role that he had performed so often in his life. he inspired the strikers by telling them their labor struggle was connected to the historic labor struggle throughout the wo
. and this transformation of the world's peasants, and many of us are not too many generations removed from peasantery, has been the most important achievement of the modern age. * and i have learned that this freedom struggle has been accomplished not simply through this transformation accomplished not simply through freedom struggles, but through the mass migrationses that brought my parents out of the south toward opportunities in the north. and with that great transformation of peasants into citizens is still going on right here in san francisco and in california. he chose to end, and i'll end, his great oration on that last day with his recognition that our struggle and his dream is still unfulfilled. i can imagine him, if he were invited back today as an 84-year-old, he would still be talking about the fact that his dream remains unfulfilled. i could see that his dream, however, still endures in the freedom struggles of our time and in all future freedom struggles. because we can still imagine him speaking of the day when freedom will ring in every village, in every hamlet throughout the world, and t
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)